Dog Boarding in Kuwait

Post by Mark


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Watch a pigeon get sold for KD15,000 in Kuwait

Post by Mark

Note to self:
1- Capture pigeons
2- Setup instagram account called @pigeonsq8
3- Sell pigeons

[YouTube]


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Extinct shark found at the Sharq Fish Market

Post by Mark

fishmarket

This story has been making rounds all over the internet the past few days but the actual discovery was made back in 2008. A shark species thought to be extinct was found dead at the Souk Sharq Fish Market. More interestingly though, flipping through the photos in the article, I had no idea shark fishing was so prevalent in the region. [Link]


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Two baboons caught at a school

Post by Mark

K’S PATH were called in to a school in Salmiya yesterday to capture two baboons that were on the loose. The two baboons had climbed into the school from the streets forcing the children to stay inside until they were caught.

That’s just so random…


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Kuwait Zoo to start selling animals

Post by Mark

animalsforsale

According to Kuwait Times, the zoo is going to start selling some of their animals because they have too many of them and not enough space. My recommendation is to go for a Pygmy Goat, they’re just too damn cute (they’d make great funny YouTube videos). [Link]


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Cats safety awarness

Post by Mark

I spotted the flyer above stuck on a wall near Sultan Center Shaab and thought it was pretty thoughtful. A quick check of the instagram account @santanimals reveals its an account with the goal to help stray animals in Kuwait as well as creating awareness on animals in general. A great initiative.


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3 Kuwait addicts hide drugs under dog

Post by Mark

Three Kuwaiti drug addicts and their massive dog were in their car heading out of their capital when a police patrol waved them to stop after suspecting their behavior.

The three quickly put the narcotics in a plastic bag and hid it under the dog before asking it to lie on the bag and stay there.

When the cops told them to get out to search the car, one of them warned the police not to come near the dog on the grounds it is savage and could be easily irritated.

“But the police insisted on searching the car…they were surprised to find that the dog is very calm and obedient…when they led the dog out of the car, they found the bag which contained hashish and other drugs,” Alanba daily said. [Source]

I thought this was funny to share.


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Kuwait Zoo tiger needs a new home

Post by Mark

We at Kuwait Zoo have a male Bengal Tiger over 15 years of age who needs a new loving home. The Zoo wants to euthanize him because of lack of space. Please advise. We are looking for any facility anywhere in the world that could take him. Preferably somewhere close to Kuwait so that he wouldn’t have to travel far.

Thank you.
Kuwait Zoo

That’s just sad. [Source]

Update: The original request in the forum was deleted and replaced with one line that says “incorrect information”


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Event: Bark in the Park

Post by Mark

K’s PATH are organizing their third Bark in the Park event which includes the popular dog show competition and which will be held at the beautiful Japanese Gardens again.

Date: Saturday 26th October 2013
Location: KOC Ahmadi Japanese Garden (GPS Co-ords: 29.091577,48.074874)
Time: 11:00AM to 4:00PM

Mutt Competitions:
1. Best Look Alike
2. Best Dressed
3. Best Rescue
4. Best Child Handler
5. Most Adorable
6. Agility Round
7. Temptation Alley
8. Best Mixed Breed

– Registration closes Thursday, Oct 24th

Register online by clicking [Here]
The online form also guides you to calculate entry fees, which can be paid at the door on the day of the event.

For more information on the event and the original flyer click [Here]


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Our Natural Heritage is Vanishing

Post by John Peaveler

In 2011, there was a meeting held between the Kuwait Society for the Protection of Animals and Their Habitat (K’S PATH) and en.v, a Kuwaiti social responsibility organization. The purpose of that meeting was to discuss how, with limited sponsorship and very limited government support, the two organizations could work together to provide real, tangible, and lasting protection for some of the last remaining coastal habitat areas in Kuwait Bay. The result, after much discussion, was the joint venture Al Yaal, whose mission would be to conduct hands-on conservation in three coastal habitats, document those efforts, and educate the population of Kuwait about the needs of our fragile environment. From the beginning, we didn’t know if the program would work. There was no way to predict whether or not our work would be enough to improve the environment we set out to protect, nor whether or not we would be able to engage the community to conserve coastal areas they had never seen before and had no vested interest in. The program was destined from the beginning to be a small, grass-roots effort to protect something we all knew would vanish if no one fought for it. The results would be surprising in more ways than one.

K’S PATH has been around now for about ten years, providing animal sheltering, education, lobbying, habitat protection, consultancy, and more. People who interact with us for the first time are often surprised that an organization like ours exists, not just because we help animals, but even more so because we are so professional in the way we work. Their surprise is understandable, because in general, we don’t make a lot of noise. We are able to do all of the things we do, and do them well, because we invest most of our time and effort into our programs and have very little left over for publicity. We brought this same focus and dedication to the Al Yaal program. There are many organizations that clean beaches in Kuwait, and they all deserve commendation for doing so. What most of them have in common is that they clean beaches humans use for recreation. With our animal and environment-centric focus, we wanted to protect areas that are important coastal habitat, so we started doing some research to see what areas were the most at risk of pollution and encroachment. Through a process of interviews and observation, we selected three beach areas notable for their plant life, their bird life, their animal life, their lack of development, lack of human visitation, and heavy pollution. Two sites were chosen in Sulaibikhat area, and one in the Doha area.

K’S PATH has always operated with a simple philosophy: planning and hard work equals results. Planning for this program included hiring program manager Angelique Bhattacharjie-Jeremiah, purchasing equipment, organizing volunteers, getting ministry permits, and coordinating between the different organizations involved. By April of 2011, planning was complete and the hard work began. Cleaning a beach with the idea of habitat preservation in mind is a meticulous job. Heavy equipment and teams of laborers play no part in removing waste from a sensitive habitat. Each item of waste has to be carefully removed by hand without destroying or even damaging plants or animal dens. The pace is slow, the temperature grueling, and success comes at a snails pace. Despite dozens of bags of garbage collected, it’s difficult to notice any improvement after the first few cleanups. Still, the volunteers kept coming.

The Al Yaal concept doesn’t rely upon a single body or group of volunteers. Instead, a different social group, school, or society is involved in each clean up, thereby maximizing the number of people who participate in this important project. After all, participation is an incredibly effective form of education, and engaging so many different people from so many different walks of life helped tremendously in breaking up the tedium of our efforts. K’S PATH staff and dedicated program volunteers in particular deserve a very hearty thank you for their consistent hard work (they were present at nearly every clean up for two years), but even after the first dozen clean ups, nothing much seemed to change. Sans instant gratification, we just kept working. And working. And working. All told, we came back 45 times and cleaned up over 5 tons of waste at Doha beach alone. The task was arduous, but rewarding.

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