Bake and Educate

Post by Mark

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A couple of nights ago I was over at a friends place when I was introduced to Noor AlObaid, the young Kuwaiti behind the nonprofit charity organization Bake and Educate. I was so fascinated with the story that I couldn’t wait to post about it on the blog.

Noor started Bake and Educate at the age of 14 years old. She grew up with a mixed background, her father is Kuwaiti while her mum is Syrian so she got to see life from both perspectives, the easy privileged life of a Kuwaiti and the struggle of a Shami in Kuwait. Ever since she was a kid her mother used to teach her that because God had given them a good life, they have to give back to people who aren’t as fortunate. So she started giving a few dinars from her allowance to less fortunate children and when she grew older it just became a habit.

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Noor went to a private American school and her tuition at one point had reached around KD5,000 a year. On the other hand the tuition fees for some Arabic private schools in Kuwait were only around KD400 to KD500 per student per year and yet several families had difficulty affording that. In 2009, Noor’s mum received a list 21 pages long of students that were financially unable to cover their school fees. The overdue payments ranged anywhere from KD20 up to KD400 so they came up with the idea to create a baking exhibition where all proceeds would be used to cover the student fees. At first it was a difficult concept for people to understand, why would a 14 year old be running a non-profit? Why is it for education? People didn’t realize the significance of a diploma and how without one, many places wouldn’t be willing to employ a non-Kuwaiti.

At first Bake and Education started off as a yearly exhibition and then it became bi-annual until they started doing delivery. By 2012, Bake and Educate had started to gain a reputation after working closely with the Ministry of Youth and EQUAIT. In the 6 years since Noor started Bake and Educate the program has helped cover the tuition of 389 students while also helping refugee camps in Syria.

How does it work?
With each donation or order you will receive an official Bake and Educate receipt. When payment is received, Bake and Educate contact the schools and send the money over either on the same day or the morning after. Once the money is received by the accountant of the school, they deduct the amount from a students overdue payment and provide Bake and Educate with a receipt which they file. Bake and Educate is an officially registered non-profit organization. Some of the schools they work with are AlJamil School, AlRiqqa Elementary School and AlWataniya School, however, they try to work with any school that is willing to accept financial aid for students.

So if you’re interested in what they’re doing, follow them on instagram @bakeandeducate


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8 comments, add your own...


  1. That is awesome Mark! I love learning about new charities and will share this as well. As an expat having to pay private school fees for the last 11 years I know all too well how difficult it gets as the cost of living rises and wages stay the same.

  2. Ahmed El Darawi says:

    Mark, thanks for this amazing email but the Instagram name has an extra C added. the account is @cakeandeducate.

  3. Rob says:

    Belated Happy birthday Mark :)

  4. Ipsom says:

    A simple link to the full menu with prices on the bio of the Instagram account would be nice.

    I know she will probably read the comments, so I hope I will see this change soon lol :p
    Other than that, great project and initiative!

  5. Aunt Marie's says:

    This is wonderful and a local charity I would be proud to have my budding business associated with. Thank you for your post and making me aware of it.

  6. Kuttan says:

    Thanks for sharing these stories Mark. I am so proud to see Kuwaitis who do good stuff like this. It instills in me hope for Kuwait.

  7. Mai says:

    Wow! What an inspiration Noor. Truly Amazing & thanks for sharing!


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