Fruits and Vegetables for your Dog

Posted by Mark

belgian shepherd 3 months old

I was trying to find out if carrots were healthy for Geo our dog and I found the following list helpful and interesting.

* Apples (they contain potassium, which stimulates the immune system, and pepsin, which helps the stomach)
* Broccoli (rich in vitamins)
* Carrots (rich in vitamins, great treats to substitute for biscuits)
* Cabbage (rich in vitamins, good for digestive system and skin)
* Cucumber (good for teeth and bones due to potassium content; can combine with carrots to promote a healthy liver and kidneys; in juice form, a good diuretic … peel cucumbers unless organically grown)
* Celery (chopped or juiced; can help with arthritis)
* Garlic (removes waste from blood, can help repel fleas; use fresh garlic finely minced)
* Green beans (lightly steamed; healthy and low-cal treat)
* Parsley (can reduce allergy symptoms and aid kidney function; chop finely or boil parsley and add the juice over food)
* Kale (rich in antioxidants and can help reduce allergy symptoms)
* Spinach (very healthy; serve chopped)
* Bananas (in small quantity; a coveted treat)
* Olive oil (a tablespoon a day is good for skin and fur)

* Preparation suggestions: Many veggies can be served raw, lightly steamed or in juice form. For most vegetables such as broccoli and carrots, it is far better to steam them instead of serving raw for improved digestibility and nutritional value. Also, since dogs have small digestive tracts, you can puree vegetables to enable your pet to digest more. If you use canned vegetables, get the salt-free kinds.

* Organically grown benefits: Due to their smaller size and more compact body systems, pets can be more prone to the toxic effects of pesticide contamination than are people. So it is best to feed them produce that is organically certified, which also has higher nutritional value for everyone.

[source]


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57 comments, add your own...


  1. mar says:

    MIKI is so spoiled now. he has already developped a food screening habbit and i dont think hell accept any veggies and fruits in his diet

    • Clarissa says:

      I wouldn’t be to sure. We have three dogs and our youngest will eat almost anything and once she started the others joined. You can’t say carrots in my house without being stampeded on the way to the fridge

  2. Mark says:

    we introduced geo to Broccoli the other day, he didnt know if it was a toy, food, plant etc.. it just confused him

  3. holla says:

    dude dogs are carnivores. they have been surviving well on meat the past 1000 years, no need to change that now. plus feeding your dog garlic yuck, i hope you enjoy extra nasty dog breath and fats.

  4. holla says:

    [edit]farts[/edit]

  5. Mark says:

    yes dogs were living in the wild and eating animals for the past 1000 years. but they usually also eat the stomach of the animal which contains vegies. i am supposed to either feed geo stomach with its contents or feed him vegetables and fruits.. guess which i chose lol

  6. seven says:

    boring crap

  7. Nonaw says:

    mark… check this website… you wrote about it months ago… see what happend :P :
    http://www.dvdiat.com/

  8. Mark says:

    lol thats funny

  9. is7aq says:

    poor geo!
    what has he done to deserve such punishment!
    this is cruelty towards dogs!

    when was the last time YOU ate broccoli!

    sidj haram!

    geo.. run!

  10. 3abboud of rak says:

    await the mega fart-fest..

    it might be a good idea tho because he’s still young and his digestive might get used to processing shit preferred by herbivore.

    your comment about the broccolli introduction was just hilarios lol

  11. Noor says:

    Hi Mark,

    This is off-topic but I’m working on a research project about the Kuwait blogs and was wondering if you wouldn’t mind taking my survey? Full details are below:

    —–

    My name is Noor Ali-Hasan and I am a graduate student at the University of Michigan School of Information. As part of my master’s thesis project, I am currently conducting a study about bloggers and their social networks. Based on your blog, you have been selected to participate in a short online survey about blogging. To qualify for the survey, you must meet the following qualifications:

    * Be at least 18 years of age
    * Currently keep a blog
    * Have a blog that contains a blogroll and/or allows comments
    * Have a blog that is part of the Kuwait Blogs community

    Your participation is completely voluntary. The survey should take about ten to thirty minutes to complete. You may access the survey at this address:

    http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.asp?A=120826072E1053

    All survey data will be kept confidential. The study’s findings will be reported in aggregates and will not be used to identify a specific person. If you have any questions about this survey, please email me at nooraz@umich.edu.

    Your time and participation is greatly appreciated!

    Thank you!

    Noor Ali-Hasan
    Master’s Student, Human-Computer Interaction
    School of Information
    University of Michigan

  12. holla says:

    lol@dvdiat site.

  13. Shelley says:

    Our Malinois will do anything — anything — for strawberries and carrots. Even though we live in prime strawberry country, I had to give my plants to my neighbors, because it was too frustrating to never get any ourselves. The Mal would wait until they were perfectly ripe, then pluck them (leaving the greens). We swear he has prehensile lips!

  14. megan says:

    Thank you so musch for this web site! My pug gertie loves apples and asparagus and i wanted to try other foods for her, this is just what i needed. THANKS!

  15. patti says:

    Dogs, while not true carnivores, are opportunistic, carnivorous scavengers. Cats on the other hand are true, obligate carnivores, requiring animal protein to survive. There is a difference between a carnivorous scavenger and an omnivore though – dogs lack the dental characteristics, longer digestive tract and specific enzymes of true omnivores like humans. That is the reason why they can not digest grains and vegetables unless they are “predigested” by processing, mincing/grinding, breakdown by enzymes, or fermentation through bacteria. Once converted, they are fully available to the dog.

    This does, however, not mean that your dog will thrive on a diet mainly made up of poor quality grains or grain fragments, which is what most cheap foods are. Whole grains, including their entire complement of nutrients are much more valuable – and this does not only apply for a dog’s diet, but for humans as well!

  16. terena says:

    Thanks!!! I have 2 dogs, a lab and a kelpie, both love carrots. They prefer carrots to dog food so I thought I would find out what other veggies dogs like. I tried broccoli but the smell turned them off. One is a bit overweight so I thought I would substitute more veggies for their normal dog food. One site I checked out said all veggies should be steamed or pureed or the dogs couldn’t digest the food and would get no nutritional benefit. Since my backyard looks like an uprooted carrot field, I would probably agree.

  17. Veronica says:

    Hi

    I have a 18 month old lab/cross and is prone to being overweight. I found that tin food and complete dog food made him bloated and gassy.

    With the help of my friend and the vet, I now prepare his food at home and he has rice, pasta, chicken, mixer biscuits, grated carrots, brockli, cabbages, sometimes carrots and pears and apples. I also give a supplement “Bob Martin”. He is leaner, happier and full up and contented.

    • Gretchen says:

      I,now have a dog that eats everything, except spinich. She grow toofat on packaged dog food. Ifeed her chicken rice, turkey and very lean beef. I would like to know if there is any fruites or vegetables she should’nt have???

  18. Aileen says:

    Hi,
    Thank you for sharing you information with other people.

    I have a 6 month old puppy and ever since we got him I have been feeding him lots of vegetables and fruits daily. Everyday in the afternoon I would give him some carrots as treats and other days I would give him cucumber, broccoli (stem only), beans and bell peppers. He loved them all except celery. He didn’t like the smell. Then at night after dinner I would eat a fruit and my dog would also get some apples (Red delicious, Fuji apple, only sweet ones) or Chinese pears (crunch and lots of juice).
    Every time we took him to the Vet. Clinic, the vet would say he’s very healthy: nice teeth and strong bones. So I think adding fruits and veggies to your dog’s diet can definitely made them healthier.

    *For those who are skeptic about letting your dogs eat fruits/vegetables, why don’t you give it a try. Introduce eat veggie or fruit slowly to your dog, let them sniff and taste it, if they don’t like it then skip that fruit or veggie. I can guarantee you that you dog will definitely love CARROTS and APPLES (sweet ones only).
    Happy Trying!!

    • Aen says:

      I bought a very expensive box of cherry tomatoes, I felt a little bad about spending so much money for such a little box, but I knew they would be delicious. Later I went to get them off the counter where I had left them and they were GONE all of them, the big black dog (doodle) got them and ate them all :(

      Last summer our first summer at our new home, I saw my dog out back doing something in the fenced in yard, later I went to look and found he had pulled down all the raspberry bushes and eaten ALL the ripe raspberries. :( My dog loves fruits and vegetables and helps himself. No I am not under feeding my dog . . . He just likes the good stuff :) He also loves carrots.

  19. Marilyn says:

    Suggesting the addition of veggies finely chopped/pureed DOES NOT give cause to call the dog a “vegetarian” !! My dogs LOVE the fresh vegetables that I puree and put in 2-3 day serving containers for freezing. I add the veggies to their kibble, along with home-cooked chicken. I buy organic.

  20. Sue says:

    I cook for my three dogs (ever since the wet dogfood scare) that I mix with dry kibble. I cook chicken that I get when it’s the weekly grocery special. I mix it with small pasta or brown rice and canned veggies, like carrots, green beans, lima beans, peas, spinach, corn. Ocassionaly I will give them plain oatmeal, mixed with bananas or apples. Sometimes I will get an inexpensive beef roast and mix it with barley and again, mixed veggies. I have also mixed canned pumpkin in with their food. My dogs love raw carrots and cantaloupe and peanut butter. While cooking for your dogs may seem expensive, it’s really not. I make a big batch at one time and freeze until needed.

  21. Pants says:

    Actually apple skins are toxic. And grape skins, but if you peel them they love them!

  22. Danielle says:

    My dog lucy loves vegs…. she always wants to eat apples, cucumbers, or even carrots. She even steals them off the table… :) lol

    I am considering cooking food for her though, I barely cook for husband lol …apple skins … how toxic are they?

  23. Bea says:

    Garlic is toxic to dogs—that totally shouldn’t be on the list!

    • Aleksandra says:

      my dog got pancreatitis during a period of time when i made home made food for himof chicken, rice, carrots, peas and garlic. thats what the recipe said and i made it for him, he than got very sick. have not used it since.. and thank God my baby is ok! But carrots on the other hand, they looooooooove them :)

      • Ky's Mama says:

        Garlic is NOT good for dogs… this is not very good information about what veggies and fruit you can give your dog. If you want to know about this stuff just ask your vet. Don’t take advice from someone who is stealing years of life from their dog.

        If you give them proper nutritional foods for them… like the specially formulated dog food (ps they make organic ones too) they can live up to two years or more longer than the expected life span. And I would bet if you have a dog and are looking for good things to give em you want them to be with you for as long as possible.

  24. Matthew says:

    Hi.

    Yor list is misleading. Just because a vegetable is good for us, does not mean it is good for your dog.

    Please check this list before feeding any of the above foods to your dog.

    http://www.doggiebistro.com/Common_Foods_Unsafe_For_Dogs.html

    Thanks.

    • Ky's Mama says:

      Thank you for having posted this site. It seems a bit more accurate and it says to consult with your Vet before giving the dog any of the foods.

  25. Tammie says:

    My puppie – Suki – is now 9 weeks old. We’ve had her for three weeks, and our vet recommends fruit and veggies over store bought treats. He compared store bought treat to trinkies… store bought treats are dipped in fat to attract the dog to it. We have only given her fruit and veggies as treats since we’ve had her – her absolute favourite is banana… which can be very helpful if she ever needs meds… you can hid the pill in the banana – genius :)

  26. uncosame says:

    I hate how people like holla are saying stuff like “ohh, dogs have eaten meat for so many years in the wild”… shutup. Dogs can eat both if they freaking want to. And like mark said, they probably got the nutrients from fruits and veggies from the stomach of animals they eat. In fact fruts and veggies are healthier treats for dogs, with the exception of grapes, fruit cores, seeds, and citrus fruits of course lol.

  27. Heather says:

    Due to bad genetics our dog almost died at 2 years old from every ailment imaginable. We were spending thousands of dollars and nothing was helping. She had chronic ear, eye, and skin infections. She had inflammatory bowel disease. She had a drug resistant urninary tract infection. She was throwing up blood for crying out loud! Our traditional vets office called her “the million dollar dog”. A friend suggested we take her to a holistic vet which is what ended up saving her life. I cannot stress how important a balanced meat/veggies diet is, esp the freshness aspect. It wasn’t that much more expensive or time consuming and our dog NEVER gets sick anymore. She’s 4 and hasn’t needed a vet visit for ANYTHING. Veggies are absolutley fantastic for dogs. She’s loves to eat spinach, beets, carrots, green beans, garlic, sweet potato, squash, etc. She also gets fresh meat. Obviously just as a healthy diet can improve the immune system in humans the same happens with animals. This is basic commen sense. If you are too lazy or narrow minded to do this for your animal, ESPECIALLY when they are sick then you shouldn’t have one in the first place. Our dog is living proof that a healthy diet makes a difference… period.

  28. i think this is good , and people that are hating on this well….obvisouly theyre trying to help you to make your dog live for a long time but then again im vergetarin Lol. but i do feed my dog meet .

  29. YorkiePuppyOwner says:

    Ive always had big dogs and now that Ive adopted a Yorkie I wanted to be more cautious with the diet,since it is common knowledge that smaller breeds are more prone to glycemia,allergies,and all in all have a delicate immune system.I spent weeks doing research on dog kibble I realized the holistic ones are top of the line but they”re suitable for people that can them or that really dont enjoy cooking.Last night after work I boiled a chicken and a bit of liver(for d vitD3 and iron)then added lentils(for d fiber) beets, broccoli, carrots, cabbage, garlic, zucchini, yeast,grape seed oil,2eggs and a scoop of white yogurt(for d calcium),Of course I froze half of d whole.Let me tell u that my puppy hasnt farted at all.is playful,energetic,alert and his breath is sweeter than the day I picked him up from the breeder.If people take the time to read the ingredients of the dog foods they’ll see that along the meat also veggies are present.However I dont agree dogs being made into vegeterian animals.They do need 75%minimum of meat in their diet.

  30. ela says:

    so dogs are allowed fruit are strawberrys ok coz i have a 8 month old staffodshire bull tterrier called rocky and wen he ate the strawberry 3 days later he vomited 1 strawberry i am scred but bless yu and yr dog

  31. ela says:

    i heard dogs are NOT allowed grapes coz they can not digest it gosh not in a rude way no offense tho dude

  32. lauren says:

    my dog solo was crazy about cherries. when i was pregnant with my son all i wanted was fruits and veggies, and solo would sit on the couch next to me waiting for some of the food i was eating.while i had heard that grapes were toxic after he had eaten a few, nothing happened to him. i think that giving your dogs some fruits and veggies is a great thing!!! its just a nice treat for them

  33. connie russell says:

    i have a chinese crested pup that is 5 months old. i am getting him used to fruits and veggies because i think it is good for them. i steam veggies , any kind he will eat, and he loves them. i put one jelled fish oil 1000units over his veggies every morning. great for skin and hair. he does not like many store bought treats and i will not buy anything made in china. so he gets apple bananas.ect. i do always peel off skin. and as his kibble goes he has a bowel of ennova dry food always. check out dog food analisis.com to see what is in the dog food you feed your dog . you will be shocked . so as far as what every one else thinks you need to do ,do what you think is best for your own dog. there are some toxic foods. so do your home work before you feed. good luck.

  34. busters_brigade says:

    the trick to feeding veggies to the hounds is making sure that they can be digested. as was brought up above, dogs are carnivores who historically got their vegetables pre digested from other animals stomachs. as such, dogs do not have the enzymes needed to fully break down and extract nutrients from raw veggies. the solution- boil em! chop up sweet potatoes and carrots (squash, pumpkin, peas, the list is endless)!!! don’t remove the skins and even add some of the boiled water to the food as it will be full of goodness! if there is a fruit smoothie stand in your town they probably have a juicer, which means that they have a large surplus of vegetable pulp which they will be more than happy to not have to throw out. you can bag it and freeze it adding a bit each day. as with everything else you do need to watch what and how much they get. onions are not a dogs friend and nightshade vegetables (even tomatoes) can be toxic. GRAPES AND RAISINS CAUSE ACUTE RENAL FAILURE- dogs love em but they’re like chocolate. also instead of olive oil, try hemp oil- its got way more digestable omega acids- also available from fish but a spoonful of this stuff is the same as feeding my mastiff/lab a whole salmon! Buster (my dog) has been on a heavily supplemented diet and human grade organic food for the last two years and the differences are insane. he eats half of what he did on Purina (insert generic grocery store dog food here) and doesn’t have an ounce of fat on him, his energy is just like when he was a puppy ( he is five) and his skin and coat are flawless. i really cant say enough about the benefit but really DO YOUR RESEARCH! feeding the wrong things can really hurt your furry friend fast! (ha! say that en times fast). this is my first post with you guys and i apologize for the book i’m leaving.
    cheers

  35. Shawna says:

    Dogs (cats too) should NEVER get onion or garlic, it destroys red blood cells and causes anemia

  36. Kc says:

    I work as a dog groomer and used to groom two shetland sheepdogs and the owner never gave them meat only fed them vegetables, the dogs coats were a mess whenever I bathed them and their stools were always very soft to the point it used to pile up on the backs of their bums. A few months apart they died, the second one a few weeks before he died he was given meat to help keep him alive and his liver cleaned out the dog had good stools and his coat was very clean.
    The natural fats in meat keeps the coat clean and the body in good working order, dogs are not meant to be vegetarians. True enough they can have vegetables but they need meat as well, if dogs didn’t eat meat they wouldn’t have sharp teeth. We humans have both canine teeth and flat teeth for eating both.

  37. Heather says:

    Yes, DOGS MUST EAT MEAT. Clearly anybody who only feeds their dogs veggies and grains are out of their minds. Veggies are a fantastic addition to a normal healthy diet. All in balance!

  38. Julie says:

    I am a vet, and Garlic, Brocolli, AND apples, are toxic to dogs. You need to get your facts straight. Some dogs might get killed because of your list.

    • Mary says:

      I saw your posting…Is there a vet site where we can get an accurate list of the fruits and vegetables they can eat. My vet said to give my dog green beans at night with a smaller amount of food to help her loose weight and it is working. They also eat baby carrots as treats they love them.

  39. Sue says:

    Julie, as a vet…I would think you should know how to spell BROCCOLI.

  40. Heather says:

    I’m sorry, but that’s crazy. Garlic in small amounts is great for dogs and helps keep fleas and ticks away, cooked broccoli is also fantastic. All in moderation. My dog never gets sick because I’ve been informed by my holistic vet and doing research what veggies are good for dogs, and she’s a purebred! While I appreciate traditional vets for what they can do, they’ve never been able to tell me the right food to feed my dog. Time to get better informed.

  41. Vicki says:

    Broccoli is no more toxic to dogs than humans. Everything is toxic if eaten in absurd quantities – both to dogs and humans. Julie, I do not believe you are really a vet. Apples are not particularly toxic either except the pips and you still need to feed gigantic amounts. Garlic is OK occasionally, but should only be given occasionally because it inhibits blood cell formation so if eaten daily your dog cannot make enough blood.

  42. Snowys says:

    Hello, I have a question if anyone can help. After researching a lot about the best food for my chihuahua I came to the conclusion that I will definitely give him home made food. I think I have the protein (meat) and carbohydrate options down packed however how much and what do I add to this in order for my dog to get the vitamins, minerals and nutrients I know he needs? Is there a website that can give me a list of the different foods that contain the vitamins, minerals and how much to add? Thanks so much

  43. Sue says:

    Found this info on the net from a website called
    petsynergy.com
    A good basic diet for dogs should be composed of 50% grains, which should ideally be boiled or steamed. This more closely matches semi-digested grains in the stomachs of the animals that dogs consume in the wild, which is an important part of their diet. The staple grain is usually brown rice, but other organic wholegrains such as oatmeal, barley, millet, corn or amaranth can also be added for variety. Vegetables should make up about 25% of the complete cooked diet and I also recommend boiling or steaming these lightly, then chopping them finely depending on the preference of the individual pet. Some larger dogs love their vegetables whole or raw and this is fine, while some smaller breeds may enjoy them made into more of a puree in a food processor. It is also fine to finely grate raw vegetables such as carrots or zucchini. Virtually all vegetables are acceptable, although favorites include carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, yellow squash, zucchini and Brussels sprouts.

    The protein content should be also about 25% although some people prefer to feed higher, especially to young, active, working animals, pregnant females, and growing puppies. If the meat is organic and fresh it can be safely fed raw, which is the ideal. A healthy dog should have enough acid in the stomach to safely kill pathogenic bacteria. If the source of the meat is suspect it may be lightly steamed or boiled, and you may do this if you are nervous about feeding your dog raw meat, or if your dog is older or sick and tolerates lightly cooked meat better. I would not recommend feeding raw pork, because of parasites, and anyhow prefer beef, chicken turkey or rabbit as a protein source. Organ meats such as heart, liver or kidney can also be fed once or twice a week. Liver is very nutritious and large quantities are not required, or recommended because of the high levels of vitamin A but a small amount once or twice a week is a good addition to the diet. A large raw organic beef leg bone fed once a week is an excellent dietary addition and keeps your dogs teeth free of plaque and gum disease.

    An occasional egg is also acceptable, and these can be fed raw or cooked, although some people prefer to remove the egg white when feeding them raw because this contains an enzyme which can denature biotin, an important B vitamin in the body. Personally I feed my dogs an occasional raw egg, just as they might scavenge in the wild, and have seen no problems from this, and they love it. Fish is also acceptable and this is also something that dogs, and other wild carnivores would eat in the wild if they had the opportunity to do so. The best way to measure the diet is to make mix 2 measures (such as a cup) of grains with one measure of vegetables and one measure of meat. It is also essential to add vitamins and minerals to the diet. A useful mixture, which was formulated by Dr. Pitcairn is given below:

    2 cups of nutritional yeast with 1 to 1 1/2 cups of bonemeal and 1/2 cup of kelp powder. Mix together and add to the diet daily. See chart below for quantities. In addition mix separately 1 1/2 cups of olive oil, or safflower oil with 50 to 100 iu of vitamin E. I also like to add 1/4 cup of flaxseed oil, which is good for the coat.

    up to 15 lb dog – 2 tsp of powder and 1 tsp oil mix daily
    15 to 30 lb dog – 4 tsp of powder and 2 tsp oil mix daily
    30 to 50 lb dog – 2 tbs of powder and 1 tbs oil mix daily
    over 80 lb dog – 1/4 cup powder and 2 tbs oil mix daily (tsp = teaspoon, tbs =tablespoon)
    A good basic diet for dogs should be composed of 50% grains, which should ideally be boiled or steamed. This more closely matches semi-digested grains in the stomachs of the animals that dogs consume in the wild, which is an important part of their diet. The staple grain is usually brown rice, but other organic wholegrains such as oatmeal, barley, millet, corn or amaranth can also be added for variety. Vegetables should make up about 25% of the complete cooked diet and I also recommend boiling or steaming these lightly, then chopping them finely depending on the preference of the individual pet. Some larger dogs love their vegetables whole or raw and this is fine, while some smaller breeds may enjoy them made into more of a puree in a food processor. It is also fine to finely grate raw vegetables such as carrots or zucchini. Virtually all vegetables are acceptable, although favorites include carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, yellow squash, zucchini and Brussels sprouts.

    The protein content should be also about 25% although some people prefer to feed higher, especially to young, active, working animals, pregnant females, and growing puppies. If the meat is organic and fresh it can be safely fed raw, which is the ideal. A healthy dog should have enough acid in the stomach to safely kill pathogenic bacteria. If the source of the meat is suspect it may be lightly steamed or boiled, and you may do this if you are nervous about feeding your dog raw meat, or if your dog is older or sick and tolerates lightly cooked meat better. I would not recommend feeding raw pork, because of parasites, and anyhow prefer beef, chicken turkey or rabbit as a protein source. Organ meats such as heart, liver or kidney can also be fed once or twice a week. Liver is very nutritious and large quantities are not required, or recommended because of the high levels of vitamin A but a small amount once or twice a week is a good addition to the diet. A large raw organic beef leg bone fed once a week is an excellent dietary addition and keeps your dogs teeth free of plaque and gum disease.

    An occasional egg is also acceptable, and these can be fed raw or cooked, although some people prefer to remove the egg white when feeding them raw because this contains an enzyme which can denature biotin, an important B vitamin in the body. Personally I feed my dogs an occasional raw egg, just as they might scavenge in the wild, and have seen no problems from this, and they love it. Fish is also acceptable and this is also something that dogs, and other wild carnivores would eat in the wild if they had the opportunity to do so. The best way to measure the diet is to make mix 2 measures (such as a cup) of grains with one measure of vegetables and one measure of meat. It is also essential to add vitamins and minerals to the diet. A useful mixture, which was formulated by Dr. Pitcairn is given below:

    2 cups of nutritional yeast with 1 to 1 1/2 cups of bonemeal and 1/2 cup of kelp powder. Mix together and add to the diet daily. See chart below for quantities. In addition mix separately 1 1/2 cups of olive oil, or safflower oil with 50 to 100 iu of vitamin E. I also like to add 1/4 cup of flaxseed oil, which is good for the coat.

    up to 15 lb dog – 2 tsp of powder and 1 tsp oil mix daily
    15 to 30 lb dog – 4 tsp of powder and 2 tsp oil mix daily
    30 to 50 lb dog – 2 tbs of powder and 1 tbs oil mix daily
    over 80 lb dog – 1/4 cup powder and 2 tbs oil mix daily (tsp = teaspoon, tbs =tablespoon)

    A good basic diet for dogs should be composed of 50% grains, which should ideally be boiled or steamed. This more closely matches semi-digested grains in the stomachs of the animals that dogs consume in the wild, which is an important part of their diet. The staple grain is usually brown rice, but other organic wholegrains such as oatmeal, barley, millet, corn or amaranth can also be added for variety. Vegetables should make up about 25% of the complete cooked diet and I also recommend boiling or steaming these lightly, then chopping them finely depending on the preference of the individual pet. Some larger dogs love their vegetables whole or raw and this is fine, while some smaller breeds may enjoy them made into more of a puree in a food processor. It is also fine to finely grate raw vegetables such as carrots or zucchini. Virtually all vegetables are acceptable, although favorites include carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, yellow squash, zucchini and Brussels sprouts.

    The protein content should be also about 25% although some people prefer to feed higher, especially to young, active, working animals, pregnant females, and growing puppies. If the meat is organic and fresh it can be safely fed raw, which is the ideal. A healthy dog should have enough acid in the stomach to safely kill pathogenic bacteria. If the source of the meat is suspect it may be lightly steamed or boiled, and you may do this if you are nervous about feeding your dog raw meat, or if your dog is older or sick and tolerates lightly cooked meat better. I would not recommend feeding raw pork, because of parasites, and anyhow prefer beef, chicken turkey or rabbit as a protein source. Organ meats such as heart, liver or kidney can also be fed once or twice a week. Liver is very nutritious and large quantities are not required, or recommended because of the high levels of vitamin A but a small amount once or twice a week is a good addition to the diet. A large raw organic beef leg bone fed once a week is an excellent dietary addition and keeps your dogs teeth free of plaque and gum disease.

    An occasional egg is also acceptable, and these can be fed raw or cooked, although some people prefer to remove the egg white when feeding them raw because this contains an enzyme which can denature biotin, an important B vitamin in the body. Personally I feed my dogs an occasional raw egg, just as they might scavenge in the wild, and have seen no problems from this, and they love it. Fish is also acceptable and this is also something that dogs, and other wild carnivores would eat in the wild if they had the opportunity to do so. The best way to measure the diet is to make mix 2 measures (such as a cup) of grains with one measure of vegetables and one measure of meat. It is also essential to add vitamins and minerals to the diet. A useful mixture, which was formulated by Dr. Pitcairn is given below:

    2 cups of nutritional yeast with 1 to 1 1/2 cups of bonemeal and 1/2 cup of kelp powder. Mix together and add to the diet daily. See chart below for quantities. In addition mix separately 1 1/2 cups of olive oil, or safflower oil with 50 to 100 iu of vitamin E. I also like to add 1/4 cup of flaxseed oil, which is good for the coat.

    up to 15 lb dog – 2 tsp of powder and 1 tsp oil mix daily
    15 to 30 lb dog – 4 tsp of powder and 2 tsp oil mix daily
    30 to 50 lb dog – 2 tbs of powder and 1 tbs oil mix daily
    over 80 lb dog – 1/4 cup powder and 2 tbs oil mix daily (tsp = teaspoon, tbs =tablespoon)
    A good basic diet for dogs should be composed of 50% grains, which should ideally be boiled or steamed. This more closely matches semi-digested grains in the stomachs of the animals that dogs consume in the wild, which is an important part of their diet. The staple grain is usually brown rice, but other organic wholegrains such as oatmeal, barley, millet, corn or amaranth can also be added for variety. Vegetables should make up about 25% of the complete cooked diet and I also recommend boiling or steaming these lightly, then chopping them finely depending on the preference of the individual pet. Some larger dogs love their vegetables whole or raw and this is fine, while some smaller breeds may enjoy them made into more of a puree in a food processor. It is also fine to finely grate raw vegetables such as carrots or zucchini. Virtually all vegetables are acceptable, although favorites include carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, yellow squash, zucchini and Brussels sprouts.

    The protein content should be also about 25% although some people prefer to feed higher, especially to young, active, working animals, pregnant females, and growing puppies. If the meat is organic and fresh it can be safely fed raw, which is the ideal. A healthy dog should have enough acid in the stomach to safely kill pathogenic bacteria. If the source of the meat is suspect it may be lightly steamed or boiled, and you may do this if you are nervous about feeding your dog raw meat, or if your dog is older or sick and tolerates lightly cooked meat better. I would not recommend feeding raw pork, because of parasites, and anyhow prefer beef, chicken turkey or rabbit as a protein source. Organ meats such as heart, liver or kidney can also be fed once or twice a week. Liver is very nutritious and large quantities are not required, or recommended because of the high levels of vitamin A but a small amount once or twice a week is a good addition to the diet. A large raw organic beef leg bone fed once a week is an excellent dietary addition and keeps your dogs teeth free of plaque and gum disease.

    An occasional egg is also acceptable, and these can be fed raw or cooked, although some people prefer to remove the egg white when feeding them raw because this contains an enzyme which can denature biotin, an important B vitamin in the body. Personally I feed my dogs an occasional raw egg, just as they might scavenge in the wild, and have seen no problems from this, and they love it. Fish is also acceptable and this is also something that dogs, and other wild carnivores would eat in the wild if they had the opportunity to do so. The best way to measure the diet is to make mix 2 measures (such as a cup) of grains with one measure of vegetables and one measure of meat. It is also essential to add vitamins and minerals to the diet. A useful mixture, which was formulated by Dr. Pitcairn is given below:

    2 cups of nutritional yeast with 1 to 1 1/2 cups of bonemeal and 1/2 cup of kelp powder. Mix together and add to the diet daily. See chart below for quantities. In addition mix separately 1 1/2 cups of olive oil, or safflower oil with 50 to 100 iu of vitamin E. I also like to add 1/4 cup of flaxseed oil, which is good for the coat.

    up to 15 lb dog – 2 tsp of powder and 1 tsp oil mix daily
    15 to 30 lb dog – 4 tsp of powder and 2 tsp oil mix daily
    30 to 50 lb dog – 2 tbs of powder and 1 tbs oil mix daily
    over 80 lb dog – 1/4 cup powder and 2 tbs oil mix daily (tsp = teaspoon, tbs =tablespoon)

    A good basic diet for dogs should be composed of 50% grains, which should ideally be boiled or steamed. This more closely matches semi-digested grains in the stomachs of the animals that dogs consume in the wild, which is an important part of their diet. The staple grain is usually brown rice, but other organic wholegrains such as oatmeal, barley, millet, corn or amaranth can also be added for variety. Vegetables should make up about 25% of the complete cooked diet and I also recommend boiling or steaming these lightly, then chopping them finely depending on the preference of the individual pet. Some larger dogs love their vegetables whole or raw and this is fine, while some smaller breeds may enjoy them made into more of a puree in a food processor. It is also fine to finely grate raw vegetables such as carrots or zucchini. Virtually all vegetables are acceptable, although favorites include carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, yellow squash, zucchini and Brussels sprouts.

    The protein content should be also about 25% although some people prefer to feed higher, especially to young, active, working animals, pregnant females, and growing puppies. If the meat is organic and fresh it can be safely fed raw, which is the ideal. A healthy dog should have enough acid in the stomach to safely kill pathogenic bacteria. If the source of the meat is suspect it may be lightly steamed or boiled, and you may do this if you are nervous about feeding your dog raw meat, or if your dog is older or sick and tolerates lightly cooked meat better. I would not recommend feeding raw pork, because of parasites, and anyhow prefer beef, chicken turkey or rabbit as a protein source. Organ meats such as heart, liver or kidney can also be fed once or twice a week. Liver is very nutritious and large quantities are not required, or recommended because of the high levels of vitamin A but a small amount once or twice a week is a good addition to the diet. A large raw organic beef leg bone fed once a week is an excellent dietary addition and keeps your dogs teeth free of plaque and gum disease.

    An occasional egg is also acceptable, and these can be fed raw or cooked, although some people prefer to remove the egg white when feeding them raw because this contains an enzyme which can denature biotin, an important B vitamin in the body. Personally I feed my dogs an occasional raw egg, just as they might scavenge in the wild, and have seen no problems from this, and they love it. Fish is also acceptable and this is also something that dogs, and other wild carnivores would eat in the wild if they had the opportunity to do so. The best way to measure the diet is to make mix 2 measures (such as a cup) of grains with one measure of vegetables and one measure of meat. It is also essential to add vitamins and minerals to the diet. A useful mixture, which was formulated by Dr. Pitcairn is given below:

    2 cups of nutritional yeast with 1 to 1 1/2 cups of bonemeal and 1/2 cup of kelp powder. Mix together and add to the diet daily. See chart below for quantities. In addition mix separately 1 1/2 cups of olive oil, or safflower oil with 50 to 100 iu of vitamin E. I also like to add 1/4 cup of flaxseed oil, which is good for the coat.

    up to 15 lb dog – 2 tsp of powder and 1 tsp oil mix daily
    15 to 30 lb dog – 4 tsp of powder and 2 tsp oil mix daily
    30 to 50 lb dog – 2 tbs of powder and 1 tbs oil mix daily
    over 80 lb dog – 1/4 cup powder and 2 tbs oil mix daily (tsp = teaspoon, tbs =tablespoon)

  44. Snowys says:

    SUE,

    THANKS SOOOO MUCH FOR THE INFO AND TAKING THE TIME TO HELP ME. YOU HAVE DEFINITELY GIVEN ME THE INFORMATION I NEEDED. THANKS AGAIN!!!

  45. Alexander Hawkeswood says:

    Dogs don’t need meat to be healthy. Sure it’s natural for them to hunt in the wild, but they also naturally gnaw on grains like wheat. You’ve probably seen dogs chew grass, that’s a clear sign of this. They are also fond of nuts so it’s likely they would crack nuts in the wild with their strong teeth. And there is such a thing as evolution. Pandas are classed as carnivores but for a long time have sustained themselves on bamboo. This makes up about 99% of their diet and they do fine on it. Vegetarian dogs tend to be healthier and live longer. The border collie, Bramble, is a good example. Anne Heritage fed her on a vegan diet since the age of 2 and she lived a very active life right on up to the age of 29. Yes, the dog. This not only goes to show that dogs don’t need meat, but also that they can live very healthy and very long lives without it. There are veterinarians who encourage dogs to be fed vegetarian diets and they’re likely to know best

  46. ankit says:

    can i give tomatoes to my puppy

  47. SusieQ22 says:

    Tomatoes are very acidic and so can cause stomach upset in some dogs. Tomatoes aren’t a fruit that is poisonous to dogs so if she enjoys them she can certainly have a few here and there. Stay away from tomatoes cooked with garlic or onion however because those are toxic to dogs. The leaves and stems of tomato plants are toxic however so don’t let your dog pick her own or she may get sick from eating the plant

  48. YoMomma says:

    i thought dogs are NOT allowed to eat GARLIC!!


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