$10,000 RISK FREE money, just give me your bank account details

Posted by Mark

We’ve all gotten emails from people offering us money either because their uncle who owns a diamond mine passed away or maybe they inherited the money from their father who was king of Samboliadoodoo before he got killed in a coup d’état. Well what if one of these emails turned out to be true? Mother, an ad agency in London sent out an email to hundreds of people telling them they would give them $10,000 risk free money and all they had to do was reply back with their full name and bank account details. Well one guy did reply, and guess what happened? Watch the video. [YouTube]


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17 comments, add your own...


  1. Mesh says:

    Once back when i was in Jordan i got email ends with .fr and the source was some where in south Africa, i decided to go along with them just for the sake to see what it will end up “hoping” , they started calling me, i thought its a money laundry but it was a scam, after i gave them fake details (closed bank account #) they told me OK every thing is confirmed and please fill this form and send it with 1000 $ to this address as it’s the fees for transaction, i was like lol, yea right what ever ..

  2. kwt23 says:

    all i can say is wow…who would’ve thought the money would end up with her??

  3. Bu Yousef says:

    I like the happy ending – but this is very irresponsible, in my opinion.

  4. Danderma says:

    Okkkk why am i having flashbacks from the box movie?

    o shame on that ad agency! Instead of raising awareness regarding email scams and lecturing people not to fall for them… they are endorsing falling for that behavior !!!!

    Wain il money laundering police 3nhom?!!!!

  5. jaja says:

    this is extremely wrong, people watching this video will start responding to this kind of scam emails when we want them to realize it’s scam and they have not been chosen out of the whole world to get free money

  6. ~LE~ says:

    Why do I have a feeling that its all set up? Even the dude who “supposedly” received the 10,000 dollars.

  7. mayhem says:

    still to good to be true… it would’ve been a bit realistic if someone from other country aside from london would be the recipient..

    still look spam to me…

    only the gullible got fooled..

  8. Venkatesh says:

    Thats wonderful! Of course giving is glorious!

  9. cajie says:

    However good the ending may be – I am totally with Bu Yousef and other commentators on this one. Nigerians might be high-fiving each other and hoping that this video gets more coverage as this is a fantastic marketing tool for their scams.
    They must have already copied the letter and started sending it out.

    They are better ways to give out $10,000 and get positive media coverage for a company.

  10. Kuwait says:

    After watching this, I really hope the rich Nigerian princess I’m trying to woo is genuine too. After the wedding, I get immediate access to $5 million.

    Just a couple more emails b/w us and I’m set for life.

  11. Cartman-kw says:

    One time I got one of those emails telling me I won and they wanted to send me the money. They didn’t need any transfer fees but they had a condition in which I had to pay 10% of the prize to chairty of their choice. Guess in what country the chairty was. Yes Nigeria. I stoped replying after this point.

  12. pixil says:

    i think this is a all a set up. they benefit from it is to make people beleive it and send the same email again so people actually reply with their true info.

  13. nirvana says:

    is freelotto.com website a liar?

  14. TATA says:

    @Danderma, exactly my thought!
    These people are endorsing positive replies to email scammers. What the hell are they doing?

    I loved the ending though her initial reaction is hilarious
    ;P

  15. Does it matter? says:

    But it is totally the responsibility of whoever is receiving the email to check out the possibility of the existence of such entity! First you can check the domain name in the email of the sender, if it is not from yahoo, hotmail..etc. then i’ll go ahead and ask for further information. If you’re receiving an email that you won X amount then you should start asking for official documents such as: company commercial license, registration number……etc.

    I don’t think it’s wrong to give money away as a gift, and I don’t also think it’s wrong to market it through an email campaign. Do you use online banking? Do you know that you can get scam links to fake bank sites that are identical to the ones your bank uses?

    …so just keep your eyes open and be cautious but also enjoy if something good happens to you :)


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